Professional writer = professional reader

Being a professional writer now means I can be a professional reader. Montaigne said he made bouquets out of other men’s flowers, but he was the one who provided the string to tie them together. I like that image, except bouquets eventually die, and the great thing about books is that they are paper bouquets that never die: they can be torn to their pieces and rearranged indefinitely.”

An intercourse with the world (Austin Kleon)

I’m a voracious reader. I think my blog proves that. I used to feel guilty for all my reading — I felt like I wasn’t producing enough, or doing enough — but not so much anymore. All these inputs are the raw material, and when the time comes, when I need to, I can remix what I’ve learned to create something new.

Invest in success every single day

“It’s easy to overestimate the importance of luck on success and underestimate the importance of investing in success every single day.”

The Surprising Power of the Long Game (Farnam Street)

This goes hand-in-hand with another FS post I shared last week: repetition is a better way to learn. Together, both embrace a sort of maintenance-first approach.

Increasingly, I’m thinking of life in a set of “buckets”:

  • My home — house > neighbourhood > town > province > country
  • My career — my work at GoDaddy, but more broadly as well
  • My health — physical and mental
  • My relationships — family and friends
  • My hobbies — art, reading, writing, tinkering with tech

And every week I try — albeit not always successfully — to move things forward in each bucket. That might be doing stuff around the house, hitting the gym a few times, meeting with friends, chomping through some new books, studying something new.

My hope is that all of that adds up to a successful life.

Sorry, Google doesn’t want to send search traffic to you.

“Broadly, I believe the narrative for web marketers is clear. The largest source of traffic on the web — free and paid — is becoming a walled garden, intent on not only keeping people on its own properties, but competing directly with those that helped it become a dominant, monopoly power.

If you’re a marketer or a business that relies on Google, there’s still tons of opportunity left (at least in most sectors; sorry Expedia, Yelp, TripAdvisor, and anyone trying to compete against YouTube). But to stay ahead, you need plans for how to diversify your traffic sources, how to grow branded demand outside of search, and how to earn value from zero-click searches. Like global warming, it’s the inevitable future whether we like it or not.”

Google in 2020 (SparkToro)

Google’s been making these moves for a while but it’s more blatant than ever.

I’m not angry at Google about any of this. They have a right to do what they want with their platform. And I’m sure it really does create a better experience for average Google users.

So, as marketers, we need to adjust accordingly.

Free traffic from Google was never going to last. They’re the 21st century equivalent of a 20th century broadcaster or publisher. They own the attention. Advertisers pay to get a small piece of it.

This is another one of the reasons that I’m bullish on community, newsletters, original content, et al. Brands need to start producing things worth subscribing to, joining, and sharing with others.

Wear out your beginner gear

“Wearing out your beginner gear is like graduating. You know that you’ve stuck with the sport long enough that you aren’t truly a beginner anymore. You may have managed to save up some cash for the next step. And you can buy the nicer gear now, knowing exactly what you want and need.”

Buy the cheap thing first (Kottke)

+ Beginner gear isn’t the same thing as cheap gear. A decent entry-level bicycle from your local bike shop (shoutout Northern Cycle!) will almost always be more expensive than buying a Supercycle from Canadian Tire.