Gutenberg is more complex because it does more

“I won’t argue that Gutenberg isn’t more complex than the classic editor when viewed at the macro level. It is! But that’s because it can do so much more. It’s the first step in setting up for the long term goal of the project, which will simplify overall site creation and management.”

The Gutenberg Complexity Fallacy (William Earnhardt)

This post is a year old — almost to the day! It feels particularly timely given the State of the Word presentation at WordCamp US this past week.

Matt Mullenweg ran his presentation from a Gutenberg-powered WordPress plugin. He demoed clever Gutenberg implementations for newsrooms and an inline block directory to help with block discovery.

TL;DR = Blocks are the future of WordPress, and I’m all for it.

My blog uses the new block editor. Every new site I create uses the block editor or, if I’m feeling particularly frisky, the Gutenberg plugin.

Fun fact: they’re different! The editor is in core, the Gutenberg plugin is the latest-and-greatest. Features are tested in the plugin before they get added to core.

I’m not alone in my enthusiasm for blocks. The WordPress plugin repo is quickly filling up with new block collections. We’ve gone all-in on blocks at GoDaddy, too.

Rich Tabor (creator of CoBlocks) joined the team earlier this year, and we’re releasing a new WordPress theme crafted specifically for the block editor.

…now we just need more blocks to build with!

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