Bring back the bloggers

“The biggest stars of the mommy Internet now are no longer confessional bloggers. They’re curators of life. They’re influencers,” the Washington Post wrote in 2018. “They’re pitchwomen. And with all the photos of minimalist kitchens and the explosion of affiliate links, we’ve lost a source of support and community, a place to share vulnerability and find like-minded women, and a forum for female expertise and wisdom.”

via She was the “queen of the mommy bloggers.” Then her life fell apart. (Vox)

Fall 2019: WordCamps & meetups are back on the calendar!

Happy Monday!

We’re nearing the end of the summer and my attention is turning to the fall.

Autumn is a busy season for community groups. Attendance picks up as fair weather gives way to grey skies. Meetups, conferences, and other indoor events fill the calendar through to the new year.

I’m joining my friend Brent Kobayashi on August 27th to co-host the first of a new monthly meetup series. We’ll talk about building WordPress sites for not-for-profit organizations. I haven’t done much NFP work in a while and I’m eager to jump into the conversation.

Also coming up, I’ll be:

Co-hosting WP Durham’s Fall Social meetup on September 5th. We’ll be at Brock St. Espresso in Whitby, which is fantastic, because it combines two of my favourite things: websites and coffee.

Keynoting WordCamp Rochester 2019 on October 5th. I’ll be talking about the history of WordPress as a platform and as a community, and where we can go from here in 2020 and beyond.

Speaking at WordCamp Niagara 2019. My session is a step-by-step walkthrough for building a community hub website with WordPress.

Co-hosting the “Grow Your Meetup!” workshop at WordCamp US 2019 on November 1st alongside some talented organizer friends.

Read more…Fall 2019: WordCamps & meetups are back on the calendar!

Community Marketing & The Culting of Brands


I’m big on community. It’s the common thread connecting all my work. It started with gaming forums in high school; then tech meetups in college; and then conferences (WordCamps) after moving to Toronto.

When I joined GoDaddy in 2015, it was to serve as the Community Manager for GoDaddy Pro. This was the first time I’d thought of “community” at a professional level. All my community work had, up to that point, been volunteer-based.

I’ve since moved on from that Community Manager role. The last couple of years have focused on content projects like the GoDaddy Blog. But my “community itch” hasn’t gone away.

I’m still a believer in the power of community marketing, as much as I’m a believer in the power of content marketing.

Read more…Community Marketing & The Culting of Brands

Extracting content from events

I attended WordCamp Miami 2019 a couple weeks ago. During that time, my Twitter account unleashed a flood of live-tweeted takeaways.

Most of those tweets came from the detailed notes I was taking. This habit of sharing highlights and commentary during conferences is my way of staying engaged and breaking the ice with other attendees. (I’m terrible at networking.)

Beyond that, the consolidated notes, tweets, and photos also make for a great post-event asset. Especially when it’s focused on the evergreen aspects of the information, like actionable advice, learnings, and follow-up notes.

So that’s what I did with WordCamp Miami. Instead of posting a typical “recap” blog post, I led with what most potential readers would care about:

50+ tips for freelancers from WordCamp Miami 2019.

Yes, the post is still a recap. But it’s not about the event. It’s about the value that came out of the event. The insights, the lessons, the conversation.

These details are partly why people attend conferences like this in the first place. So if I can capture some of that, and put it back out into the community, I feel like that’s a decent way of paying it forward.

I’d love to see similar recaps coming out of other conferences. It’s more practical than watching all the recorded sessions. So how do you do it? I have a five step approach that I bust out every time.

Read more…Extracting content from events